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NEW QUESTION 1
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Penny has recently joined Ace Space, a company that sells homeware accessories online, as its new privacy officer. The company is based in California but thanks to some great publicity from a social media influencer last year, the company has received an influx of sales from the EU and has set up a regional office in Ireland to support this expansion. To become familiar with Ace Space’s practices and assess what her privacy priorities will be, Penny has set up meetings with a number of colleagues to hear about the work that they have been doing and their compliance efforts.
Penny’s colleague in Marketing is excited by the new sales and the company’s plans, but is also concerned that Penny may curtail some of the growth opportunities he has planned. He tells her “I heard someone in the breakroom talking about some new privacy laws but I really don’t think it affects us. We’re just a small company. I mean we just sell accessories online, so what’s the real risk?” He has also told her that he works with a number of small companies that help him get projects completed in a hurry. “We’ve got to meet our deadlines otherwise we lose money. I just sign the contracts and get Jim in finance to push through the payment. Reviewing the contracts takes time that we just don’t have.”
In her meeting with a member of the IT team, Penny has learned that although Ace Space has taken a number of precautions to protect its website from malicious activity, it has not taken the same level of care of its physical files or internal infrastructure. Penny’s colleague in IT has told her that a former employee lost an encrypted USB key with financial data on it when he left. The company nearly lost access to their customer database last year after they fell victim to a phishing attack. Penny is told by her IT colleague that the IT team “didn’t know what to do or who should do what. We hadn’t been trained on it but we’re a small team though, so it worked out OK in the end.” Penny is concerned that these issues will compromise Ace Space’s privacy and data protection.
Penny is aware that the company has solid plans to grow its international sales and will be working closely with the CEO to give the organization a data “shake up”. Her mission is to cultivate a strong privacy culture within the company.
Penny has a meeting with Ace Space’s CEO today and has been asked to give her first impressions and an overview of her next steps.
To help Penny and her CEO with their objectives, what would be the most helpful approach to address her IT concerns?

  • A. Roll out an encryption policy
  • B. Undertake a tabletop exercise
  • C. Ensure inventory of IT assets is maintained
  • D. Host a town hall discussion for all IT employees

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 2
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
For 15 years, Albert has worked at Treasure Box – a mail order company in the United States (U.S.) that used to sell decorative candles around the world, but has recently decided to limit its shipments to customers in the 48 contiguous states. Despite his years of experience, Albert is often overlooked for managerial positions. His frustration about not being promoted, coupled with his recent interest in issues of privacy protection, have motivated Albert to be an agent of positive change.
He will soon interview for a newly advertised position, and during the interview, Albert plans on making executives aware of lapses in the company’s privacy program. He feels certain he will be rewarded with a promotion for preventing negative consequences resulting from the company’s outdated policies and procedures.
For example, Albert has learned about the AICPA (American Institute of Certified Public Accountans)/CICA (Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants) Privacy Maturity Model (PMM). Albert thinks the model is a useful way to measure Treasure Box’s ability to protect personal data. Albert has noticed that Treasure Box fails to meet the requirements of the highest level of maturity of this model; at his interview, Albert will pledge to assist the company with meeting this level in order to provide customers with the most rigorous security available.
Albert does want to show a positive outlook during his interview. He intends to praise the company’s commitment to the security of customer and employee personal data against external threats. However, Albert worries about the high turnover rate within the company, particularly in the area of direct phone marketing. He sees many unfamiliar faces every day who are hired to do the marketing, and he often hears complaints in the lunch room regarding long hours and low pay, as well as what seems to be flagrant disregard for company procedures.
In addition, Treasure Box has had two recent security incidents. The company has responded to the incidents with internal audits and updates to security safeguards. However, profits still seem to be affected and anecdotal evidence indicates that many people still harbor mistrust. Albert wants to help the company recover. He knows there is at least one incident the public in unaware of, although Albert does not know the details. He believes the company’s insistence on keeping the incident a secret could be a further detriment to its reputation. One further way that Albert wants to help Treasure Box regain its stature is by creating a toll-free number for customers, as well as a more efficient procedure for responding to customer concerns by postal mail.
In addition to his suggestions for improvement, Albert believes that his knowledge of the company’s recent business maneuvers will also impress the interviewers. For example, Albert is aware of the company’s intention to acquire a medical supply company in the coming weeks.
With his forward thinking, Albert hopes to convince the managers who will be interviewing him that he is right for the job.
What is one important factor that Albert fails to consider regarding Treasure Box’s response to their recent security incident?

  • A. Who has access to the data
  • B. What the nature of the data is
  • C. How data at the company is collected
  • D. How long data at the company is kept

Answer: D

NEW QUESTION 3
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
For 15 years, Albert has worked at Treasure Box – a mail order company in the United States (U.S.) that used to sell decorative candles around the world, but has recently decided to limit its shipments to customers in the 48 contiguous states. Despite his years of experience, Albert is often overlooked for managerial positions. His frustration about not being promoted, coupled with his recent interest in issues of privacy protection, have motivated Albert to be an agent of positive change.
He will soon interview for a newly advertised position, and during the interview, Albert plans on making executives aware of lapses in the company’s privacy program. He feels certain he will be rewarded with a promotion for preventing negative consequences resulting from the company’s outdated policies and procedures.
For example, Albert has learned about the AICPA (American Institute of Certified Public Accountans)/CICA (Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants) Privacy Maturity Model (PMM). Albert thinks the model is a useful way to measure Treasure Box’s ability to protect personal data. Albert has noticed that Treasure Box fails to meet the requirements of the highest level of maturity of this model; at his interview, Albert will pledge to assist the company with meeting this level in order to provide customers with the most rigorous security available.
Albert does want to show a positive outlook during his interview. He intends to praise the company’s commitment to the security of customer and employee personal data against external threats. However, Albert worries about the high turnover rate within the company, particularly in the area of direct phone marketing. He sees many unfamiliar faces every day who are hired to do the marketing, and he often hears complaints in the lunch room regarding long hours and low pay, as well as what seems to be flagrant disregard for company procedures.
In addition, Treasure Box has had two recent security incidents. The company has responded to the incidents with internal audits and updates to security safeguards. However, profits still seem to be affected and anecdotal evidence indicates that many people still harbor mistrust. Albert wants to help the company recover. He knows there is at least one incident the public in unaware of, although Albert does not know the details. He believes the company’s insistence on keeping the incident a secret could be a further detriment to its reputation. One further way that Albert wants to help Treasure Box regain its stature is by creating a toll-free number for customers, as well as a more efficient procedure for responding to customer concerns by postal mail.
In addition to his suggestions for improvement, Albert believes that his knowledge of the company’s recent business maneuvers will also impress the interviewers. For example, Albert is aware of the company’s intention to acquire a medical supply company in the coming weeks.
With his forward thinking, Albert hopes to convince the managers who will be interviewing him that he is right for the job.
On which of the following topics does Albert most likely need additional knowledge?

  • A. The role of privacy in retail companies
  • B. The necessary maturity level of privacy programs
  • C. The possibility of delegating responsibilities related to privacy
  • D. The requirements for a managerial position with privacy protection duties

Answer: C

NEW QUESTION 4
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Penny has recently joined Ace Space, a company that sells homeware accessories online, as its new privacy officer. The company is based in California but thanks to some great publicity from a social media influencer last year, the company has received an influx of sales from the EU and has set up a regional office in Ireland to support this expansion. To become familiar with Ace Space’s practices and assess what her privacy priorities will be, Penny has set up meetings with a number of colleagues to hear about the work that they have been doing and their compliance efforts.
Penny’s colleague in Marketing is excited by the new sales and the company’s plans, but is also concerned that Penny may curtail some of the growth opportunities he has planned. He tells her “I heard someone in the breakroom talking about some new privacy laws but I really don’t think it affects us. We’re just a small company. I mean we just sell accessories online, so what’s the real risk?” He has also told her that he works with a number of small companies that help him get projects completed in a hurry. “We’ve got to meet our deadlines otherwise we lose money. I just sign the contracts and get Jim in finance to push through the payment. Reviewing the contracts takes time that we just don’t have.”
In her meeting with a member of the IT team, Penny has learned that although Ace Space has taken a number of precautions to protect its website from malicious activity, it has not taken the same level of care of its physical files or internal infrastructure. Penny’s colleague in IT has told her that a former employee lost an encrypted USB key with financial data on it when he left. The company nearly lost access to their customer database last year after they fell victim to a phishing attack. Penny is told by her IT colleague that the IT team “didn’t know what to do or who should do what. We hadn’t been trained on it but we’re a small team though, so it worked out OK in the end.” Penny is concerned that these issues will compromise Ace Space’s privacy and data protection.
Penny is aware that the company has solid plans to grow its international sales and will be working closely with the CEO to give the organization a data “shake up”. Her mission is to cultivate a strong privacy culture within the company.
Penny has a meeting with Ace Space’s CEO today and has been asked to give her first impressions and an overview of her next steps.
What information will be LEAST crucial from a privacy perspective in Penny’s review of vendor contracts?

  • A. Audit rights
  • B. Liability for a data breach
  • C. Pricing for data security protections
  • D. The data a vendor will have access to

Answer: C

NEW QUESTION 5
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Richard McAdams recently graduated law school and decided to return to the small town of Lexington, Virginia to help run his aging grandfather's law practice. The elder McAdams desired a limited, lighter role in the practice, with the hope that his grandson would eventually take over when he fully retires. In addition to hiring Richard, Mr. McAdams employs two paralegals, an administrative assistant, and a part-time IT specialist who handles all of their basic networking needs. He plans to hire more employees once Richard gets settled and assesses the office's strategies for growth.
Immediately upon arrival, Richard was amazed at the amount of work that needed to done in order to modernize the office, mostly in regard to the handling of clients' personal data. His first goal is to digitize all the records kept in file cabinets, as many of the documents contain personally identifiable financial and medical data. Also, Richard has noticed the massive amount of copying by the administrative assistant throughout the day, a practice that not only adds daily to the number of files in the file cabinets, but may create security issues unless a formal policy is firmly in place Richard is also concerned with the overuse of the communal copier/ printer located in plain view of clients who frequent the building. Yet another area of concern is the use of the same fax machine by all of the employees. Richard hopes to reduce its use dramatically in order to ensure that personal data receives the utmost security and protection, and eventually move toward a strict Internet faxing policy by the year's end.
Richard expressed his concerns to his grandfather, who agreed, that updating data storage, data security, and an overall approach to increasing the protection of personal data in all facets is necessary Mr. McAdams granted him the freedom and authority to do so. Now Richard is not only beginning a career as an attorney, but also functioning as the privacy officer of the small firm. Richard plans to meet with the IT employee the following day, to get insight into how the office computer system is currently set-up and managed.
Richard believes that a transition from the use of fax machine to Internet faxing provides all of the following security benefits EXCEPT?

  • A. Greater accessibility to the faxes at an off-site location.
  • B. The ability to encrypt the transmitted faxes through a secure server.
  • C. Reduction of the risk of data being seen or copied by unauthorized personnel.
  • D. The ability to store faxes electronically, either on the user's PC or a password-protected network server.

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 6
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Amira is thrilled about the sudden expansion of NatGen. As the joint Chief Executive Officer (CEO) with her long-time business partner Sadie, Amira has watched the company grow into a major competitor in the green energy market. The current line of products includes wind turbines, solar energy panels, and equipment for geothermal systems. A talented team of developers means that NatGen's line of products will only continue to grow.
With the expansion, Amira and Sadie have received advice from new senior staff members brought on to help manage the company's growth. One recent suggestion has been to combine the legal and security functions of the company to ensure observance of privacy laws and the company's own privacy policy. This sounds overly complicated to Amira, who wants departments to be able to use, collect, store, and dispose of customer data in ways that will best suit their needs. She does not want administrative oversight and complex structuring to get in the way of people doing innovative work.
Sadie has a similar outlook. The new Chief Information Officer (CIO) has proposed what Sadie believes is an unnecessarily long timetable for designing a new privacy program. She has assured him that NatGen will use the best possible equipment for electronic storage of customer and employee data. She simply needs a list of equipment and an estimate of its cost. But the CIO insists that many issues are necessary to consider before the company gets to that stage.
Regardless, Sadie and Amira insist on giving employees space to do their jobs. Both CEOs want to entrust the monitoring of employee policy compliance to low-level managers. Amira and Sadie believe these managers can adjust the company privacy policy according to what works best for their particular departments. NatGen's CEOs know that flexible interpretations of the privacy policy in the name of promoting green energy would be highly unlikely to raise any concerns with their customer base, as long as the data is always used in course of normal business activities.
Perhaps what has been most perplexing to Sadie and Amira has been the CIO's recommendation to institute a privacy compliance hotline. Sadie and Amira have relented on this point, but they hope to compromise by allowing employees to take turns handling reports of privacy policy violations. The implementation will be easy because the employees need no special preparation. They will simply have to document any concerns they hear.
Sadie and Amira are aware that it will be challenging to stay true to their principles and guard against corporate culture strangling creativity and employee morale. They hope that all senior staff will see the benefit of trying a unique approach.
If Amira and Sadie's ideas about adherence to the company's privacy policy go unchecked, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) could potentially take action against NatGen for what?

  • A. Deceptive practices.
  • B. Failing to institute the hotline.
  • C. Failure to notify of processing.
  • D. Negligence in consistent training.

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 7
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
You lead the privacy office for a company that handles information from individuals living in several countries throughout Europe and the Americas. You begin that morning’s privacy review when a contracts officer sends you a message asking for a phone call. The message lacks clarity and detail, but you presume that data was lost.
When you contact the contracts officer, he tells you that he received a letter in the mail from a vendor stating that the vendor improperly shared information about your customers. He called the vendor and confirmed that your company recently surveyed exactly 2000 individuals about their most recent healthcare experience and sent those surveys to the vendor to transcribe it into a database, but the vendor forgot to encrypt the database as promised in the contract. As a result, the vendor has lost control of the data.
The vendor is extremely apologetic and offers to take responsibility for sending out the notifications. They tell you they set aside 2000 stamped postcards because that should reduce the time it takes to get the notice in the mail. One side is limited to their logo, but the other side is blank and they will accept whatever you want to write. You put their offer on hold and begin to develop the text around the space constraints. You are content to let the vendor’s logo be associated with the notification.
The notification explains that your company recently hired a vendor to store information about their most recent experience at St. Sebastian Hospital’s Clinic for Infectious Diseases. The vendor did not encrypt the information and no longer has control of it. All 2000 affected individuals are invited to sign-up for email notifications about their information. They simply need to go to your company’s website and watch a quick advertisement, then provide their name, email address, and month and year of birth.
You email the incident-response council for their buy-in before 9 a.m. If anything goes wrong in this situation, you want to diffuse the blame across your colleagues. Over the next eight hours, everyone emails their comments back and forth. The consultant who leads the incident-response team notes that it is his first day with the company, but he has been in other industries for 45 years and will do his best. One of the three lawyers on the council causes the conversation to veer off course, but it eventually gets back on track. At the end of the day, they vote to proceed with the notification you wrote and use the vendor’s postcards.
Shortly after the vendor mails the postcards, you learn the data was on a server that was stolen, and make the decision to have your company offer credit monitoring services. A quick internet search finds a credit monitoring company with a convincing name: Credit Under Lock and Key (CRUDLOK). Your sales rep has never handled a contract for 2000 people, but develops a proposal in about a day which says CRUDLOK will:
* 1.Send an enrollment invitation to everyone the day after the contract is signed.
* 2.Enroll someone with just their first name and the last-4 of their national identifier.
* 3.Monitor each enrollee’s credit for two years from the date of enrollment.
* 4. Send a monthly email with their credit rating and offers for credit-related services at market rates.
* 5. Charge your company 20% of the cost of any credit restoration.
You execute the contract and the enrollment invitations are emailed to the 2000 individuals. Three days later you sit down and document all that went well and all that could have gone better. You put it in a file to reference the next time an incident occurs.
Regarding the credit monitoring, which of the following would be the greatest concern?

  • A. The vendor’s representative does not have enough experience
  • B. Signing a contract with CRUDLOK which lasts longer than one year
  • C. The company did not collect enough identifiers to monitor one’s credit
  • D. You are going to notify affected individuals via a letter followed by an email

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 8
What is the best way to understand the location, use and importance of personal data within an organization?

  • A. By analyzing the data inventory.
  • B. By testing the security of data systems.
  • C. By evaluating methods for collecting data.
  • D. By interviewing employees tasked with data entry.

Answer: C

NEW QUESTION 9
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Perhaps Jack Kelly should have stayed in the U.S. He enjoys a formidable reputation inside the company, Special Handling Shipping, for his work in reforming certain "rogue" offices. Last year, news broke that a police sting operation had revealed a drug ring operating in the Providence, Rhode Island office in the United States. Video from the office's video surveillance cameras leaked to news operations showed a drug exchange between Special Handling staff and undercover officers.
In the wake of this incident, Kelly had been sent to Providence to change the "hands off" culture that upper management believed had let the criminal elements conduct their illicit transactions. After a few weeks under Kelly's direction, the office became a model of efficiency and customer service. Kelly monitored his workers' activities using the same cameras that had recorded the illegal conduct of their former co-workers.
Now Kelly has been charged with turning around the office in Cork, Ireland, another trouble spot. The company has received numerous reports of the staff leaving the office unattended. When Kelly arrived, he found that even when present, the staff often spent their days socializing or conducting personal business on their mobile phones. Again, he observed their behaviors using surveillance cameras. He issued written reprimands to six staff members based on the first day of video alone.
Much to Kelly's surprise and chagrin, he and the company are now under investigation by the Data Protection Commissioner of Ireland for allegedly violating the privacy rights of employees. Kelly was told that the company's license for the cameras listed facility security as their main use, but he does not know why this matters. He has pointed out to his superiors that the company's training programs on privacy protection and data collection mention nothing about surveillance video.
You are a privacy protection consultant, hired by the company to assess this incident, report on the legal and compliance issues, and recommend next steps.
Knowing that the regulator is now investigating, what would be the best step to take?

  • A. Consult an attorney experienced in privacy law and litigation.
  • B. Use your background and knowledge to set a course of action.
  • C. If you know the organization is guilty, advise it to accept the punishment.
  • D. Negotiate the terms of a settlement before formal legal action takes place.

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 10
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Your organization, the Chicago (U.S.)-based Society for Urban Greenspace, has used the same vendor to operate all aspects of an online store for several years. As a small nonprofit, the Society cannot afford the higher-priced options, but you have been relatively satisfied with this budget vendor, Shopping Cart Saver (SCS). Yes, there have been some issues. Twice, people who purchased items from the store have had their credit card information used fraudulently subsequent to transactions on your site, but in neither case did the investigation reveal with certainty that the Society’s store had been hacked. The thefts could have been employee-related.
Just as disconcerting was an incident where the organization discovered that SCS had sold information it had collected from customers to third parties. However, as Jason Roland, your SCS account representative, points out, it took only a phone call from you to clarify expectations and the “misunderstanding” has not occurred again.
As an information-technology program manager with the Society, the role of the privacy professional is only one of many you play. In all matters, however, you must consider the financial bottom line. While these problems with privacy protection have been significant, the additional revenues of sales of items such as shirts and coffee cups from the store have been significant. The Society’s operating budget is slim, and all sources of revenue are essential.
Now a new challenge has arisen. Jason called to say that starting in two weeks, the customer data from the store would now be stored on a data cloud. “The good news,” he says, “is that we have found a low-cost provider in Finland, where the data would also be held. So, while there may be a small charge to pass through to you, it won’t be exorbitant, especially considering the advantages of a cloud.”
Lately, you have been hearing about cloud computing and you know it’s fast becoming the new paradigm for various applications. However, you have heard mixed reviews about the potential impacts on privacy protection. You begin to research and discover that a number of the leading cloud service providers have signed a letter of intent to work together on shared conventions and technologies for privacy protection. You make a note to find out if Jason’s Finnish provider is signing on.
After conducting research, you discover a primary data protection issue with cloud computing. Which of the following should be your biggest concern?

  • A. An open programming model that results in easy access
  • B. An unwillingness of cloud providers to provide security information
  • C. A lack of vendors in the cloud computing market
  • D. A reduced resilience of data structures that may lead to data loss.

Answer: B

NEW QUESTION 11
Which is TRUE about the scope and authority of data protection oversight authorities?

  • A. The Office of the Privacy Commissioner (OPC) of Canada has the right to impose financial sanctions on violators.
  • B. All authority in the European Union rests with the Data Protection Commission (DPC).
  • C. No one agency officially oversees the enforcement of privacy regulations in the United States.
  • D. The Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Privacy Frameworks require all member nations to designate a national data protection authority.

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 12
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
You lead the privacy office for a company that handles information from individuals living in several countries throughout Europe and the Americas. You begin that morning’s privacy review when a contracts officer sends you a message asking for a phone call. The message lacks clarity and detail, but you presume that data was lost.
When you contact the contracts officer, he tells you that he received a letter in the mail from a vendor stating that the vendor improperly shared information about your customers. He called the vendor and confirmed that your company recently surveyed exactly 2000 individuals about their most recent healthcare experience and sent those surveys to the vendor to transcribe it into a database, but the vendor forgot to encrypt the database as promised in the contract. As a result, the vendor has lost control of the data.
The vendor is extremely apologetic and offers to take responsibility for sending out the notifications. They tell you they set aside 2000 stamped postcards because that should reduce the time it takes to get the notice in the mail. One side is limited to their logo, but the other side is blank and they will accept whatever you want to write. You put their offer on hold and begin to develop the text around the space constraints. You are content to let the vendor’s logo be associated with the notification.
The notification explains that your company recently hired a vendor to store information about their most recent experience at St. Sebastian Hospital’s Clinic for Infectious Diseases. The vendor did not encrypt the information and no longer has control of it. All 2000 affected individuals are invited to sign-up for email notifications about their information. They simply need to go to your company’s website and watch a quick advertisement, then provide their name, email address, and month and year of birth.
You email the incident-response council for their buy-in before 9 a.m. If anything goes wrong in this situation, you want to diffuse the blame across your colleagues. Over the next eight hours, everyone emails their comments back and forth. The consultant who leads the incident-response team notes that it is his first day with the company, but he has been in other industries for 45 years and will do his best. One of the three lawyers on the council causes the conversation to veer off course, but it eventually gets back on track. At the end of the day, they vote to proceed with the notification you wrote and use the vendor’s postcards.
Shortly after the vendor mails the postcards, you learn the data was on a server that was stolen, and make the decision to have your company offer credit monitoring services. A quick internet search finds a credit monitoring company with a convincing name: Credit Under Lock and Key (CRUDLOK). Your sales rep has never handled a contract for 2000 people, but develops a proposal in about a day which says CRUDLOK will:
* 1. Send an enrollment invitation to everyone the day after the contract is signed.
* 2. Enroll someone with just their first name and the last-4 of their national identifier.
* 3.Monitor each enrollee’s credit for two years from the date of enrollment.
* 4. Send a monthly email with their credit rating and offers for credit-related services at market rates.
* 5.Charge your company 20% of the cost of any credit restoration.
You execute the contract and the enrollment invitations are emailed to the 2000 individuals. Three days later you sit down and document all that went well and all that could have gone better. You put it in a file to reference the next time an incident occurs.
What is the most concerning limitation of the incident-response council?

  • A. You convened it to diffuse blame
  • B. The council has an overabundance of attorneys
  • C. It takes eight hours of emails to come to a decision
  • D. The leader just joined the company as a consultant

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 13
Which term describes a piece of personal data that alone may not identify an individual?

  • A. Unbundled data
  • B. A singularity
  • C. Non-aggregated infopoint
  • D. A single attribute

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 14
In regards to the collection of personal data conducted by an organization, what must the data subject be allowed to do?

  • A. Evaluate the qualifications of a third-party processor before any data is transferred to that processor.
  • B. Obtain a guarantee of prompt notification in instances involving unauthorized access of the data.
  • C. Set a time-limit as to how long the personal data may be stored by the organization.
  • D. Challenge the authenticity of the personal data and have it corrected if needed.

Answer: C

NEW QUESTION 15
Under the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which situation would be LEAST likely to require a Data Protection Impact Assessment (DPIA)?

  • A. A health clinic processing its patients’ genetic and health data
  • B. The use of a camera system to monitor driving behavior on highways
  • C. A Human Resources department using a tool to monitor its employees’ internet activity
  • D. An online magazine using a mailing list to send a generic daily digest to marketing emails

Answer: D

NEW QUESTION 16
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
John is the new privacy officer at the prestigious international law firm – A&M LLP. A&M LLP is very proud of its reputation in the practice areas of Trusts & Estates and Merger & Acquisition in both U.S. and Europe.
During lunch with a colleague from the Information Technology department, John heard that the Head of IT, Derrick, is about to outsource the firm's email continuity service to their existing email security vendor – MessageSafe. Being successful as an email hygiene vendor, MessageSafe is expanding its business by leasing cloud infrastructure from Cloud Inc. to host email continuity service for A&M LLP.
John is very concerned about this initiative. He recalled that MessageSafe was in the news six months ago due to a security breach. Immediately, John did a quick research of MessageSafe's previous breach and learned that the breach was caused by an unintentional mistake by an IT administrator. He scheduled a meeting with Derrick to address his concerns.
At the meeting, Derrick emphasized that email is the primary method for the firm's lawyers to communicate with clients, thus it is critical to have the email continuity service to avoid any possible email downtime. Derrick has been using the anti-spam service provided by MessageSafe for five years and is very happy with the quality of service provided by MessageSafe. In addition to the significant discount offered by MessageSafe, Derrick emphasized that he can also speed up the onboarding process since the firm already has a service contract in place with MessageSafe. The existing on-premises email continuity solution is about to reach its end of life very soon and he doesn't have the time or resource to look for another solution. Furthermore, the off- premises email continuity service will only be turned on when the email service at A&M LLP's primary and secondary data centers are both down, and the email messages stored at MessageSafe site for continuity service will be automatically deleted after 30 days.
Which of the following is a TRUE statement about the relationship among the organizations?

  • A. Cloud In
  • B. must notify A&M LLP of a data breach immediately.
  • C. MessageSafe is liable if Cloud In
  • D. fails to protect data from A&M LLP.
  • E. Cloud In
  • F. should enter into a data processor agreement with A&M LLP.
  • G. A&M LLP's service contract must be amended to list Cloud In
  • H. as a sub-processor.

Answer: A

NEW QUESTION 17
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Natalia, CFO of the Nationwide Grill restaurant chain, had never seen her fellow executives so anxious. Last week, a data processing firm used by the company reported that its system may have been hacked, and customer data such as names, addresses, and birthdays may have been compromised. Although the attempt was proven unsuccessful, the scare has prompted several Nationwide Grill executives to Question the company's privacy program at today's meeting.
Alice, a vice president, said that the incident could have opened the door to lawsuits, potentially damaging Nationwide Grill's market position. The Chief Information Officer (CIO), Brendan, tried to assure her that
even if there had been an actual breach, the chances of a successful suit against the company were slim. But Alice remained unconvinced.
Spencer – a former CEO and currently a senior advisor – said that he had always warned against the use of contractors for data processing. At the very least, he argued, they should be held contractually liable for telling customers about any security incidents. In his view, Nationwide Grill should not be forced to soil the company name for a problem it did not cause.
One of the business development (BD) executives, Haley, then spoke, imploring everyone to see reason. "Breaches can happen, despite organizations' best efforts," she remarked. "Reasonable preparedness is key." She reminded everyone of the incident seven years ago when the large grocery chain Tinkerton's had its financial information compromised after a large order of Nationwide Grill frozen dinners. As a long-time BD executive with a solid understanding of Tinkerton's's corporate culture, built up through many years of cultivating relationships, Haley was able to successfully manage the company's incident response.
Spencer replied that acting with reason means allowing security to be handled by the security functions within the company – not BD staff. In a similar way, he said, Human Resources (HR) needs to do a better job training employees to prevent incidents. He pointed out that Nationwide Grill employees are overwhelmed with posters, emails, and memos from both HR and the ethics department related to the company's privacy program. Both the volume and the duplication of information means that it is often ignored altogether.
Spencer said, "The company needs to dedicate itself to its privacy program and set regular in-person trainings for all staff once a month."
Alice responded that the suggestion, while well-meaning, is not practical. With many locations, local HR departments need to have flexibility with their training schedules. Silently, Natalia agreed.
What is the most realistic step the organization can take to help diminish liability in the event of another incident?

  • A. Requiring the vendor to perform periodic internal audits.
  • B. Specifying mandatory data protection practices in vendor contracts.
  • C. Keeping the majority of processing activities within the organization.
  • D. Obtaining customer consent for any third-party processing of personal data.

Answer: B

NEW QUESTION 18
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Martin Briseño is the director of human resources at the Canyon City location of the U.S. hotel chain Pacific Suites. In 1998, Briseño decided to change the hotel’s on-the-job mentoring model to a standardized training program for employees who were progressing from line positions into supervisory positions. He developed a curriculum comprising a series of lessons, scenarios, and assessments, which was delivered in-person to small groups. Interest in the training increased, leading Briseño to work with corporate HR specialists and software engineers to offer the program in an online format. The online program saved the cost of a trainer and allowed participants to work through the material at their own pace.
Upon hearing about the success of Briseño’s program, Pacific Suites corporate Vice President Maryanne Silva-Hayes expanded the training and offered it company-wide. Employees who completed the program received certification as a Pacific Suites Hospitality Supervisor. By 2001, the program had grown to provide industry-wide training. Personnel at hotels across the country could sign up and pay to take the course online. As the program became increasingly profitable, Pacific Suites developed an offshoot business, Pacific Hospitality Training (PHT). The sole focus of PHT was developing and marketing a variety of online courses and course progressions providing a number of professional certifications in the hospitality industry.
By setting up a user account with PHT, course participants could access an information library, sign up for courses, and take end-of-course certification tests. When a user opened a new account, all information was saved by default, including the user’s name, date of birth, contact information, credit card information, employer, and job title. The registration page offered an opt-out choice that users could click to not have their credit card numbers saved. Once a user name and password were established, users could return to check their course status, review and reprint their certifications, and sign up and pay for new courses. Between 2002 and 2008, PHT issued more than 700,000 professional certifications.
PHT’s profits declined in 2009 and 2010, the victim of industry downsizing and increased competition from e- learning providers. By 2011, Pacific Suites was out of the online certification business and PHT was dissolved. The training program’s systems and records remained in Pacific Suites’ digital archives, un-accessed and unused. Briseño and Silva-Hayes moved on to work for other companies, and there was no plan for handling the archived data after the program ended. After PHT was dissolved, Pacific Suites executives turned their attention to crucial day-to-day operations. They planned to deal with the PHT materials once resources allowed.
In 2012, the Pacific Suites computer network was hacked. Malware installed on the online reservation system exposed the credit card information of hundreds of hotel guests. While targeting the financial data on the reservation site, hackers also discovered the archived training course data and registration accounts of Pacific Hospitality Training’s customers. The result of the hack was the exfiltration of the credit card numbers of recent hotel guests and the exfiltration of the PHT database with all its contents.
A Pacific Suites systems analyst discovered the information security breach in a routine scan of activity reports. Pacific Suites quickly notified credit card companies and recent hotel guests of the breach, attempting to prevent serious harm. Technical security engineers faced a challenge in dealing with the PHT data.
PHT course administrators and the IT engineers did not have a system for tracking, cataloguing, and storing information. Pacific Suites has procedures in place for data access and storage, but those procedures were not implemented when PHT was formed. When the PHT database was acquired by Pacific Suites, it had no owner or oversight. By the time technical security engineers determined what private information was compromised, at least 8,000 credit card holders were potential victims of fraudulent activity.
In the Information Technology engineers had originally set the default for customer credit card information to “Do Not Save,” this action would have been in line with what concept?

  • A. Use limitation
  • B. Privacy by Design
  • C. Harm minimization
  • D. Reactive risk management

Answer: B

NEW QUESTION 19
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
You lead the privacy office for a company that handles information from individuals living in several countries throughout Europe and the Americas. You begin that morning’s privacy review when a contracts officer sends you a message asking for a phone call. The message lacks clarity and detail, but you presume that data was lost.
When you contact the contracts officer, he tells you that he received a letter in the mail from a vendor stating that the vendor improperly shared information about your customers. He called the vendor and confirmed that your company recently surveyed exactly 2000 individuals about their most recent healthcare experience and sent those surveys to the vendor to transcribe it into a database, but the vendor forgot to encrypt the database as promised in the contract. As a result, the vendor has lost control of the data.
The vendor is extremely apologetic and offers to take responsibility for sending out the notifications. They tell you they set aside 2000 stamped postcards because that should reduce the time it takes to get the notice in the mail. One side is limited to their logo, but the other side is blank and they will accept whatever you want to write. You put their offer on hold and begin to develop the text around the space constraints. You are content to let the vendor’s logo be associated with the notification.
The notification explains that your company recently hired a vendor to store information about their most recent experience at St. Sebastian Hospital’s Clinic for Infectious Diseases. The vendor did not encrypt the information and no longer has control of it. All 2000 affected individuals are invited to sign-up for email notifications about their information. They simply need to go to your company’s website and watch a quick advertisement, then provide their name, email address, and month and year of birth.
You email the incident-response council for their buy-in before 9 a.m. If anything goes wrong in this situation, you want to diffuse the blame across your colleagues. Over the next eight hours, everyone emails their comments back and forth. The consultant who leads the incident-response team notes that it is his first day with the company, but he has been in other industries for 45 years and will do his best. One of the three lawyers on the council causes the conversation to veer off course, but it eventually gets back on track. At the end of the day, they vote to proceed with the notification you wrote and use the vendor’s postcards.
Shortly after the vendor mails the postcards, you learn the data was on a server that was stolen, and make the decision to have your company offer credit monitoring services. A quick internet search finds a credit monitoring company with a convincing name: Credit Under Lock and Key (CRUDLOK). Your sales rep has never handled a contract for 2000 people, but develops a proposal in about a day which says CRUDLOK will:
* 1. Send an enrollment invitation to everyone the day after the contract is signed.
* 2. Enroll someone with just their first name and the last-4 of their national identifier.
* 3. Monitor each enrollee’s credit for two years from the date of enrollment.
* 4. Send a monthly email with their credit rating and offers for credit-related services at market rates.
* 5. Charge your company 20% of the cost of any credit restoration.
You execute the contract and the enrollment invitations are emailed to the 2000 individuals. Three days later you sit down and document all that went well and all that could have gone better. You put it in a file to reference the next time an incident occurs.
Which of the following elements of the incident did you adequately determine?

  • A. The nature of the data elements impacted
  • B. The likelihood the incident may lead to harm
  • C. The likelihood that the information is accessible and usable
  • D. The number of individuals whose information was affected

Answer: B

NEW QUESTION 20
SCENARIO
Please use the following to answer the next QUESTION:
Manasa is a product manager at Omnipresent Omnimedia, where she is responsible for leading the development of the company's flagship product, the Handy Helper. The Handy Helper is an application that can be used in the home to manage family calendars, do online shopping, and schedule doctor appointments. After having had a successful launch in the United States, the Handy Helper is about to be made available for purchase worldwide.
The packaging and user guide for the Handy Helper indicate that it is a "privacy friendly" product suitable for the whole family, including children, but does not provide any further detail or privacy notice. In order to use the application, a family creates a single account, and the primary user has access to all information about the other users. Upon start up, the primary user must check a box consenting to receive marketing emails from Omnipresent Omnimedia and selected marketing partners in order to be able to use the application.
Sanjay, the head of privacy at Omnipresent Omnimedia, was working on an agreement with a European distributor of Handy Helper when he fielded many Questions about the product from the distributor. Sanjay needed to look more closely at the product in order to be able to answer the Questions as he was not involved in the product development process.
In speaking with the product team, he learned that the Handy Helper collected and stored all of a user's sensitive medical information for the medical appointment scheduler. In fact, all of the user's information is stored by Handy Helper for the additional purpose of creating additional products and to analyze usage of the product. This data is all stored in the cloud and is encrypted both during transmission and at rest.
Consistent with the CEO's philosophy that great new product ideas can come from anyone, all Omnipresent Omnimedia employees have access to user data under a program called Eureka. Omnipresent Omnimedia is hoping that at some point in the future, the data will reveal insights that could be used to create a fully automated application that runs on artificial intelligence, but as of yet, Eureka is not well-defined and is considered a long-term goal.
What element of the Privacy by Design (PbD) framework might the Handy Helper violate?

  • A. Failure to obtain opt-in consent to marketing.
  • B. Failure to observe data localization requirements.
  • C. Failure to implement the least privilege access standard.
  • D. Failure to integrate privacy throughout the system development life cycle.

Answer: B

NEW QUESTION 21
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